Comparisons of Some Properties

(Note: i- stands for icosahedral, and denotes the quasicrystalline alloys in these Tables)


Surface energy (mJ/m2)

PTFE (similar to Teflon)

17-18

alumina

50

water

72

i-Al-Pd-Mn

24-25

Source of information in Table above: J. M. Dubois, "A Survey of the Potential Applications of Quasicrystals," in Proceedings of the Conference "New Horizons in Quasicrystals" Edited by A. Goldman, D. Sordelet, P. Thiel and J. M. Dubois, World Scientific, Singapore (1997) p. 208.

 

Young's modulus
10
6 psi*

Bulk mod.
10
6 psi

Shear mod.
10
6 psi

Poisson's ratio

Aluminum

10.2

10.9

3.8

0.345

Copper

18.8

20.0

7.01

0.343

Stainless steel
2Ni-18Cr

31.2

24.1

12.2

0.283

i-Al-Cu-Fe

8.7-9.4

i-Al-Cu-Fe doped with B

14.5

i-Al-Pd-Mn (single grain)

29

0.38

Sources for data in Table above:

All values above, except for quasicrystals are drawn from: "Mechanical, Physical, and Chemical Properties of Metals" by G. F. Carter, pp. 2-16 to 2-22 in Metals Handbook: Desk Edition, Ed. by H. E. Boyer and T. L. Gall, ASM, Metals Park, Ohio, 1985.

Data for i-Al-Cu-Fe: J. M. Dubois and P. Weinland, CNRS, Nancy, France, "Coating materials for metal alloys and metals and method," European Patent EP 0356287 A1 and US Patent 5204191, (April 20 1993).

Data for i-Al-Pd-Mn: Y. Yokoyama, et al., Mat. Trans. JIM 34 (1993) pp. 135-145.

*1 Pascal = 1.45 x 10-4 psi

 

Hardness (Hv)

kg/mm2 **

Coefficient of friction (unlubricated)

Thermal conductivity

(W kg-1 K-1)

Density

(g/cm3)

Fracture toughness (MPa m1/2)

Low-C steel

120

0.40

60

7.8

Copper

0.42

30

Al

170

2.9

Al alloy

185

0.44

Martensitic steel

700

Silica

750

Alumina

1950

3

Diamond

70-102

ZrO2 - 8 wt% YO3

2

i-Al-Pd-Mn (single grain)

700-900

0.3

i-Al-Cu-Fe

800-1000

0.05-0.2

2

4

1

i-Al-Cu-Fe*

848 + 48*

W-Al-Cu-Fe*

693 + 21*

l-Al-Cu-Fe*

908 + 39*

b-Al-Cu-Fe*

615 + 19*

Sources of information in Table above:

Dan Sordelet, 1994-8, private communications. Values marked by (*) were measured on a hot-isostatically pressed monoliths prepared from gas-atomized powders, with a 100g Vickers load. The samples of all such Al-Cu-Fe phases have a comparable history and microstructure. Ranges for these samples encompass + 1 standard deviation. The b-, l-, and W-phases are crystalline.

Metals Handbook: Desk Edition, Ed. by H. E. Boyer and T. L. Gall, ASM, Metals Park, Ohio, 1985.

Data for i-Al-Pd-Mn: Y. Yokoyama, et al. Mat. Trans. JIM 34 (1993) pp. 135-145; also A.P. Tsai, et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 31 (1992) p. 2530; also S. Takeuchi, et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 30 (1991) p. 561.

**1 kg/mm2 = 0.0098 GPa

 

Comparison of Hydrogen-Storage Properties of i-TiZrNi with Metal Hydrides of Technological Interest

Material

H/M

Weight % H

Comments

LaNi5

1.1

1.5

Negative electrodes in Ni metal-hydride rechargeable batteries

TiFe

0.9

1.6

Best material developed for stationary applications; requires high pressure or surface activation

Mg

2.0

7.7

Light, inexpensive; unloading temperature higher than typical exhaust gas from internal combustion engine

V

2.0

3.8

Expensive

Ti45Zr38Ni17

1.7

2.5

Initial investigations promising

Source of information in Table above:

Data drawn from "Hydrogen Storage in Quasicrystals" by K.F. Kelton and P.C. Gibbons in MRS Bulletin, p. 71, Nov. 1997.


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